Saturday, 14 September 2013

What is the meaning of inflation?

This is a good one for those in South Africa, where the Rand currency has lost 20% of its value in
a single year, which is good for exports of course!

Inflation, cutting money in half without damaging the paper.


Sounds about right to me and then some!

Check our new prices on the Dix Design dinghy kits, prices have beaten inflation?

www.dixdesign.com

Roy

Friday, 13 September 2013

The Cape Henry 21, repriced in Redwood Marine ply

Now lower priced at R31,084 plus vat for local customers. This is the plywood flat pack of 36 sheets of  9mm Redwood Marine plys, all CNC cut. You save over R11,000 ! which is around U$1100 right now.

For those paying in dollars allow U$3120, it will depend on the exchange rate at  the time of your order?

Plans are extra, as are the timber and epoxy, glass cloth and tapes etc. We expect the buyer to source the required timber where they are, we can supply the epoxy, tapes and fillers ex stock.

We can ship world wide.

Words by Justin Philips (many thanks)

 I have decided to cover the Cape Cutter 19 (CC19) and the Cape Henry 21 (CH21) together as they cover a number of variations on a single theme. The prospective owner or builder will doubtlessly spend quite a while mulling over these before choosing one!


 Tip Toe, a Cape Cutter 19 at rest down In South Island, New Zealand.
 

Boats, even leisure boats, exist for different reasons - racing, cruising, liveaboard, fishing, etc - and they all have their place in the sun. Day boats however, are the most special kind, because they exist purely for the fun of being on the water, for gunkholing, picnicking, camping, and simply going out to clear your head. They are generally smallish, traditional and good looking, and in my opinion maybe the purest design form available - pure art really! The CC19 and the CH21 are both brilliant examples of this.




Check the rather good SA Yacht blog for lots of info on these boats.

http://sayachts.blogspot.com/2013/05/cape-cutter-19-cape-henry-21.html

Tip Toe was built by Ian in Picton, New Zealand, CKD Boats cc supplied him the materials CNC cut
kit, also the birds mouth mast kit, all spars, the steel drop keel and also the 316 stainless steel deck package.

We can do the same for you on the Cape Henry 21 and also the Cape May 25.
Shipping world wide and from Cape Town, South Africa is not a problem.

 http://www.dixdesign.com/inspir19.htm

Roy

Find the newer Cape May here   http://dudleydix.blogspot.com/2013/05/cape-may-25-trailable-gaff-cutter.html




A quote for today

This could apply to most I think.

I started out with nothing and still have most of it.

R H McBride

Thursday, 12 September 2013

The Whitbread Volvo race returns to Cape Town

Some of you may never think either name ever left, just the name change from Whitbread and to Volvo.

Well until todays news item, South Africa was off the map for the 2014/15 race (imagine) but its back and good news too.

IAN ROMAN/Volvo Ocean Race

The start of leg 2 from Cape Town, South Africa to Abu Dhabi, UAE.
(Photo Credit must read: IAN ROMAN/Volvo Ocean Race)

Forteleza, Brasil, was to be the first stop, they would then sail right past Cape Town and on to Abu Dhabi but not now! They start in October 2014 and are due in Cape Towns V and A Waterfront November.

Roy

Try these links:

 http://www.yandy.co.uk/news/?article=172202  (copy and paste please)

Or

 http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/7312_Cape-Town-to-stage-first-stopover-on-2014-15-route.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%253A+VolvoOceanRaceNews+(Volvo+Ocean+Race+New

BS 1088 Okoume marine ply in Mauritius

Before you start looking I think I can tell you there is none to be found, excepting the eight sheets we sent by air cargo a few weeks back.



Its there now and being used on the restoration of a 1934 racing one design yacht.


This is a very large boat!


Pictures taken and supplied by Taffy and Shirley, yacht The Road, many thanks!


We have shipped a number of materials packs to the island of Mauritius and can supply things like epoxy, brass and stainless screws if required.

Other islands we have shipped materials and boat kits to are Marshall Islands, Johnston Athol, Honolulu and I think also Hawaii ( Didi 26)  all remote islands and proof we can ship your order just about any place.


I am told the idea will be to keep as much of the original boat as possible.


Roy

Wednesday, 11 September 2013

Building the Didi 34 Nandi by Dix Design

I have in the past mentioned my surprise to see the buyer of one of our Didi 34 kits launching his boat in the Hout Bay Harbour one fine October day.


Click on the picture for a larger image.

This was taken yesterday and as part of the survey for a new owner, the boat was seen to be in fine condition. Later the boat was re launched, then the seller and new owner went out in the bay for what became a two hour sail. I was told later that under sail the boat made 9.1 knots and under motor 7.6 knots!

The design is by Dudley Dix, the design and plans details are most probably the best in the world and worth the asking price some times over.


This launch was only two years after we CNC cut all the boats BS1088 okoume marine grade plywoods and machined the Meranti wood required. Our kit also supplies the epoxy and can extend right through to the fittings and the rest of the boat.

The owner builder told me yesterday that the easiest part of the whole boats build was our kit, if we consider that this was the guys very first attempt at boat building, that's quite a statement.

How great is that.

Roy

If you want to know the full story on this great design check the link below.

 http://sayachts.blogspot.com/2011/01/didi-34.html


Click on the picture to view it in full size.Who took the shot?

This is the same boat and named Nandi (nice) when launched in October 2007.

Tuesday, 10 September 2013

Didi 34 being lifted on the Hout Bay Boat Yard Travel Lift

This was part of the survey work and when we went to the HBBY (hout bay boat yard) this morning to be lifted clear of the water.


The boat was built in just two years and from one of our kits, what a fine job the builder made!

 The keel bulb is none standard but was designed by Dudley Dix and around a lead bulb mold that
the builder had the use of.

The International antifoul looks fair for 18 months in the water.

A high pressure water wash soon removed the small amount of marine growth from the under water area.

The HBBY did the lift, powerwash and re launch all in the same day.

Roy

This boat passed the survey with ease and was sold, we do have another similar design for sale , please contact me for details.

Monday, 9 September 2013

The Cape Town Boat Show 2013

Some get a little negative about boat shows but not myself, I think the trade has done a fine job!

The Cape Town International Boat Show is on from 4 - 6 October 2013

 http://www.boatshow.co.za/

In the past yacht club members got a 50% ticket reduction.

See you there folks!

Roy

The end for fibre glass? ( GRP)

Have you ever wondered  what we are to do with those old GRP boats?

Read this, hope is at hand and that's great news.

Roy

INDUSTRIAL SYMBIOSIS and  FIBERGLASS RECYCLING

Can fibreglass be recycled?
This was inspired from the WISP workshop. Is anyone recycling or reusing fibreglass waste in South Africa? And what about discarded moulds?

With a quick Google search, we’ve found that the Danish and Germans are onto it! Danish Fiberline Composites signed a contract in 2010 with the German companies Zajon, which specialises in converting waste to alternative fuels for industry, and Holcim, world’s leading cement manufacturer, to recycle surplus fibreglass.  

Fibreline gained a waste solution it had been seeking for years. Holcim can use both the energy and the minerals in the fibreglass for cement production, saving on fossil fuel and raw materials.

“Recycling 1000 tonnes of Fiberline profiles in cement manufacture saves up to 450 tonnes of coal, 200 tonnes of chalk, 200 tonnes of sand and 150 tonnes of aluminium oxide. And the recycling process produces no dust, ash or other residues.”  To read more about this, click here.

For another interesting article “RECYCLING DEAD BOATS”, click here.

Same link below, makes for fine reading!

Roy

http://www.wastexchange.org/upload_publications/RecyclingDeadBoats.pdf

R 9 no more

R 9 was one of the British Navy boats sent world wide, she was really a kit boat and sent CKD and then assembled where ever she was to be based? They were used as WW2 Air Sea rescue boats.
Dated from around 1940 and 63 feet long they have lasted well but were re planked ( where required?) after 1972 when they went into service in Hout Bay on the Duiker Island trips route (seal island)


Used by the South African Navy, she was later sold to a well known day charter company in Hout Bay.


That's the deck or coach roof on the side


I had wrongly assumed these boats were double planked but they are just close planked and then caulked on the outside.


Two engines once occupied that space.



Mr Panda, the demolition forman.


MV Circe, a sister ship, will she also be cut up?

The property that both boats are on was recently sold at an auction, I expect everything must go?

Roy

Folks, its now the 29th of September 2013, I drove past the site where the R9 was being dismantled, its gone, nothing of the hull remains.


Sunday, 8 September 2013

Lyle Hess 34 brokerage offer

With the Taylors 30L paraffin stove on offer one blog viewer says he wishes he had a suitable boat to go around that stove?

 Yes it looks excellent. Wish I had a classic wooden boat to put around it!

We can do better than that, as we have on offer a brand new Lyle Hess 34 design that the 030L Taylors paraffin stove we offer can be fitted into. We offer the stove at R8500 only, that is about U$850.

http://ckdboats.blogspot.com/2011/01/lyle-hess-designed-34-grp-hull-and-deck.html


I have been asked why this boat costs more now than it did three years back when I first posted it?

Three main reasons:

Its brand new and will be sold as such, with the South African exchange rate declining in value more than 20% and that was in 2013 alone, so the value has to be retained by raising the price.

Its been in dry storage, so of course there was rent and insurance to pay.

The owner needs to re coupe his outlay, as if he was to buy in the boats same construction materials and at todays prices, so has to adjust his asking price to do so.

Roy

Pricing as below the materials and gear list.

 http://ckdboats.blogspot.com/2010/12/sea-gauchoa-lyle-hess-34.html           Sister Ship.

FALMOUTH CUTTER 34
Lyle Hess Design

























This boat is in dry storage.
Hull and Deck moulded by Channel Cutter Yachts using Lloyd's approved Marine Grade
Isophalic Resin, the Gelcoat is Lloyd's approved NPG.
The deck has a 12mm plywood core, this is increased to 24mm in the bow area as well
as in the area around the mast for the full width of the deck.
All subsequent work was carried out by Peter Randle Yachts.

http://ckdboats.blogspot.com/2010/12/fitting-out-lyle-hess-34-hull-nice-way.html
Interior
All plywood used for Bulkheads, Cabin Sole and the interior "Rough-in" is Okoume,
Lloyd's stamped Marine Grade Ply.
18mm ply was used for the 9 bulkheads as well as for the cabin sole.
12mm and 15mm ply was used for the interor rough-in which has been dry fitted.
Iroko has been used for interior construction and for the engine bearers.
Engine Installed
Yanmar 3JH3GBE 40HP Engine
Type "C" Engine Control Panel
Aquadrive Flexible Coupling
30mm SS Shaft    
Bronze Stern Tube
Volvo Penta 19" x 14 Fixed 3-Blade Propeller
Primary Fuel Filter and Water Separator
DE-BUG L140B Fuel Treatment
Morse Remote Control Unit
270L SS Fuel Tank
150A high output Marine Alternator
Battery Switch
180L SS Holding Tank including bronze ball valves
Exterior
The Hull and Deck have been bonded and through bolted.
The Rudder has been constructed and dry hung.
The Teak Rubrail, Covering Boards, Taffrail  and 8" Bulwarks have been fitted
including 6 bronze Fairleads.
Tiller constructed from teak
Teak grab rail dry fitted to coach roof
Cockpit Coaming constructed and fitted.
Entire cockpit area has been teak decked.
Boomkin constructed from teak
Bowsprit constructed from Oregon Pine
Samson Post constructed from Iroko have been dry fitted
The Foward Hatch, Salon Skylight and Companionway Hatch constructed 
from teak (but not fitted)
Stainless Steel Fittings
6 x Chain Plates
Upper & Lower Boomkin Plates
3 x Rudder Gudgeon & Pintle sets
Tiller Attachment
Bowsprit Cranse Iron
Stemhead Gammon Iron
5 x Stay Pads
Additional Equipment
2 x 7" SS Xenon Dome Lights
4 x 4,5" SS Xenon Dome Lights
6 x Brass Swivel Reading Lights
2 x Bronze Cockpit Scuppers
4 x 12" Bronze Cleats
4 x Brass Cowl Vents
Bronze Manual Windlass
Parts for the traditional wind vane gear
Cradle
Price as she is and with the list above U$95,000.

Contact me at 27 21 7903859 phone and fax line or roy@ckdboats (dot) co.za

Tree nails?

This is a term from the past but one way of fastening old planks on wooden boats still. In the past they were the only fasteners used.

In this application I think its as much an issue of pluging the old plank holes?


The issue is that as the boats planks become old they can soften, fasteners such as nails or screws can
pull right into the plank, they can and will cause nail rot over time.


Click on the picture for a larger image.

The pegs have been fitted with what looks like phenolic glue, they then hold the plank to the new frames inside the hull. I suspect this set of tree nails is as much a way of pegging old nail holes and a secondary set of nails and coach bolts with doublers on the plank ends be fitted?

Read more on the subject below.


Ancient shipbuilding used treenails to bind the boat together. They had the advantage of not giving rise to "nail-sickness", a term for decay accelerated and concentrated around metal fasteners. Increased water content causes wood to expand, so that treenails gripped the planks tighter as they absorbed water. Similar wooden trenail fastenings were used as alternatives to metal spikes to secure rail-support "chairs" to wooden sleepers in early Victorian times.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treenail

Roy